Episode #84: Top 5 Biggest Changes in the Board Game Industry in the Last 5 Years

How has the board game industry changed in the last 5 years? Brian co-founded Overworld Games about 6 years before this was recorded so it’s also a view of how things have changed between when he started publishing games and now.

Here is the top 5 list we cover in this episode:
5) More games in big box retailers
4) It’s easier to make games
3) Kickstarter explosion
2) Growth of games at conventions
1) Distribution is harder

Audio Direct Link:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP084.mp3

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Episode #83: Top 5 Ways to Deal with Scope Creep

Patron Andrew van Ingen suggested this episode on how to deal with scope creep. Here’s the list we go through!

5) If some people don’t hate it, you are doing it wrong.

4) Don’t let experiments linger.

3) Determine the scale, audience (learning time), price point and play time of your game.

2) Have an “always pruning” mindset. Always be thinking about the parts that aren’t SUPER DUPER fun.

1) Understands that hobby gamers (and many designers) will ALWAYS ask for more.

Audio Direct Link:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP083.mp3

Episode #82: Top 5 Ways to Build a Crowd for Your Game

When you’re trying to build up a crowd for your game before Kickstarter or to build your resume for selling your game to a publisher, there are a lot of places to put your time and money, but some are better than others.

5. Create a Facebook page or group

4. Build/support your local gaming community

3. Use other’s crowds by getting your game to reviewers and other influencers

2. Send infrequent newsletters

1.Create a landing page and funnel people to it through flyers, ads, social media, and everywhere

Audio Direct Link: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP082.mp3

Episode #81: Top 5 Tips for Managing Your Day Job and Hobby Business

Jeremy and Brian give some tips for how you can better manage your day job and hobby board game business.

Resources:

Edited by: Mark Edwards

Audio Direct Link: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP081.mp3

Episode #80: Top 5 Things That Are Probably Wrong with Your Game Pitch

(link for direct download of podcast episode)

Jeremy and Brian cover the top 5 things that are most commonly wrong with a pitch a game designer gives to a publisher. If you’re a designer, you’ll probably find something in here that you can use to improve your next pitch.

Thanks to Mark Edwards for editing this and adding the intro/outro!

Episode #79: Signs It Is Time to Give up on a Design

(link for direct download of podcast episode)

When you’ve been working on a design for a while and you’re not sure if there’s enough there to keep going with it, we have some signs that it might be time to give up on it. If you want a spoiler, the signs are:

5) No market opportunity
4) Design colleagues don’t ask about the status or encourage you to keep working on it
3) Too long to play/too long to explain the rules
2) Not fun enough (playtesters don’t ask to play again)
1) No hook or the hook is not good enough

Episode #78: Reasons to Theme Your Prototype

(link for direct download of podcast episode)

We go over the top 5 reasons to theme your prototype and some discussion around them. If you want to have them spoiled, here are some of our notes on each one:

5) Theme makes it easier to learn your game. It drive cohesion, direction, and rules comprehension.

4) Some publishers really care about theme (like Brian) so you’ll get more opportunities if your game has one. You’ll get in the door. Theme sells better than math. Games are an experience, and theme tells your story.

3) A themed games is more interesting to players so you’ll get more playtesters. It shows your playtesters that you respect their time and level of enjoyment.

2) Save the publisher time by showing them it is complete. A game with no theme isn’t done yet and they would usually not do that work if they can avoid it. Once you’re in the door, you’re more likely to stay there.

1) Theme is part of the design. Why are we even talking about them as if they are independent parts?