Trapped in a Room with Juliana Patel and Ariel Rubin

Richard interviews Juliana Patel and Ariel Rubin who created the extremely successful Escape Room in a Box: The Werewolf Experiment that is now being published by Mattel. He learns all their secrets about in their 2,000+ backer debut campaign! Some specific topics:

  • Partnering with Mattel
  • Escape room game opportunities
  • Replaying escape room games
  • Playtesting an escape room game
  • Creating the puzzles
  • Lessons learned from the Kickstarter campaign
  • Finding your audience

Audio/Podcast Version: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP064.mp3

 

References

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How to Navigate Multiple Offers

This episode provides some guidelines for the situation where multiple publishers want to sign your game and how you handle it, both from the designer and publisher perspective. Specifically, we cover:

  • submitting your game to multiple publishers at the same time
  • handshake deals
  • bringing copies to a convention
  • bigger publishers vs. smaller publishers
  • asking for exclusivity
  • doing your publisher homework
  • changes to contracts
  • should I have a lawyer look over my contract?

Audio/Podcasthttp://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP063.mp3

Total Recall Post Mortem

We talk generally about publishing licensed games and specifically about the unsuccessful Total Recall Kickstarter campaign.

  • Why didn’t it fund?
  • What did you do differently?
  • Likeness rights 101
  • Timing releases in a line of games
  • Hidden costs of doing a licensed game
  • Liability insurance
  • The costs of agreeing to release dates
  • Should you create a licensed game?
  • Publishing outside of Kickstarter

Podcast Audiohttp://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP062.mp3

References

Total Recall Kickstarter Campaignhttps://www.kickstarter.com/projects/overworldgames/total-recall-the-official-tabletop-game

 

Ethics Mailbag

We have another mailbag episode! These topics were suggested by listeners:

  • Are environmental concerns a factor for publishers, manufacturers, and designers?
  • How can I make my game more accessible and inclusive?
  • What kind of support should publishers donate to charity?

Audio/Podcast: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP061b.mp3

Resources:

The Overworld Games policy on charities.

Am I a Jerk if I Don’t Back My Friend’s Kickstarter Campaign?

If you’re listening to this podcast, there’s a good chance you know someone personally who has launched a Kickstarter campaign. Did you feel obligated to back it? We try to break down this social etiquette around the subject in this episode.

Audio Link: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP060.mp3

How Should You Be Using Social Media?

Today we talk about social media and how we should use this in the board game industry. Specifically, here are some of the questions and topics:

  • How should a game designer use social media?
  • Which social media platforms should a game designer be using?
  • How should a game publisher use social media?
  • Which platforms should they use?
  • Using social media as a phone book or for ease of contacting.
  • What’s the wrong way to use social media?
  • Are there other less traditional social media platforms we should be using?
  • Are there any tools that help you more easily manage your social media accounts?

Podcast/Audio: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP058.mp3

Resources:

 

Top 5 Tips for Designing a Reference Card

Today we attempt to define what a reference card is, which isn’t as easy as you may think, and then we pull them apart and figure out which games need them and how to design them clearly. Then we end with a Top 5 list of tips to make your reference card better. Here are some questions and topics we discuss:

  • Which games do we wish had them that do not?
  • Which games have them but don’t need them?
  • Do we need one for each player?
  • The psychological effect of having a reference card.
  • Can a game be too simple to have a reference card?
  • The cost of a reference card.

Top 5 Tips for Designing a Reference Card:
#5) No Walls of Text
#4) Use 1 Double-Sided Reference Card
#3) White Space is Your Friend
#2) Make Them Visually Distinct
#1) Use Symbols

 

Podcast/Audio Version: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theforbiddenlimb/BGBP057.mp3